• All
  • Academic Writing
  • Academic Writing and Critical Reading
  • Accounting
  • Administrative Policymaking
  • American Constitutional History I
  • American Constitutional History II
  • American Foreign Policy
  • Congressional Politics I
  • Congressional Politics II
  • Constitutional Engineering
  • Constitutional Law
  • Courses
  • Current Courses
  • Economics
  • Environmental Justice
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Finance
  • Global Climate Change
  • Global Health Challenges
  • Globalization and Terrorism
  • Government
  • History
  • Humanitarian Emergencies of East Africa
  • International Law and Human Rights
  • International Political Economy
  • Introduction to International Relations
  • Introduction to Statistics
  • Pre-College Research and Scholarly Writing
  • Principles of Economics
  • Principles of Finance I
  • Principles of Finance II
  • Principles of Finance III
  • Principles of Financial Accounting
  • Public Health
  • Statistics
  • Supply Chain Management
  • The Economy of The American Revolution
  • The History of Boston I
  • The History of Boston II
  • The Transformation of China
  • World Religions

Principles of Finance I―The Financial Markets

In this module we explore how the financial markets operate; we look closely at how different types of instruments (investment products) such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and exchange traded funds (ETFs) function; and (3) explore some of the basic uses for such instruments. This module is open to all students; however, it is designed for high school students who intend to go on to college and want to develop a solid core understanding of this extremely important business topic. Students in Module I will take several short-online multiple choice quizzes and also participate in a weekly online discuss group. Students can enroll in Module I and not be required to take subsequent modules. This is a particularly beneficial option for students ages 12-15 who want to develop a basic understanding of how the stock and financial markets operate.

Principles of Finance II―Real World Applications

In Module II we primarily focus on some of the primary tools and theories used in finance, such as the internal rate of return, the efficient market hypothesis, and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). We apply these topics to real-life situations through a case-study analysis, and we learn how businesses make decisions based on these and other metrics. We also look at the different agents and institutions that are responsible for maintaining the flow of the financial markets, such as the Federal Reserve and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Students will complete several online quizzes and also participate in an online discussion group.

World Religions

This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings of religious symbols through lectures, discussion, film, and the writing of three short critical essays.

The Economy of the American Revolution

The Boston Port Bill, one of the four Coercive Acts of 1775, closed Boston Harbor to all trade and commerce, thereby affecting the local job market. Although Parliamentary laws negatively affected all of the Colonies, Boston’s economy, which relied heavily on its shipping industry, was particularly affected. How did the local job market affect the formation of America? What explains the social and economic origins of the American Revolution? This course concentrates on the social, economic, and occupational conditions between 1770 and 1775. Students will write 3 short papers that analyze the social and economic conditions during this period and explains how such conditions led to the American Revolution.

Principles of Finance III―Behavior and Psychology

Why do people and businesses make certain decisions about their money? What drives them to buy or sell stocks, real estate, or something else of value? In this module, we explore behavioral factors that drive many business decisions. We examine different theories on why people make the choices they make, and we compare the effects of psychological, cognitive, emotional, cultural and social factors on the economic decisions of individuals and institutions and how those decisions vary from those implied by classical theory. Students will complete several quizzes online, and also participate in an online group discussion.

Congressional Politics I―The History Behind the Theory

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Congressional Politics II―Applications in the Real World

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

American Constitutional History I

This course explores the development of American constitutional government, beginning with the drafting and ratifying of the state and federal constitutions in the 1770s and 1780s, problems of individual liberty versus government power, state rights, race and slavery, war powers, and pluralism. Students will write 2 essays and also participate in an online group discussion.

American Constitutional History II

This course explores the development of the United States Constitution since the Civil War. Some of the nation’s most troubling Constitutional issues were settled by the Civil War, but it also raised others. Who are citizens of the U.S.? What rights do they have under the Constitution? Who should protect these rights? What powers should the different branches of government have? How can these powers be exercised, and how can they be controlled? These are the major Constitutional questions since the Civil War. Students will write 2 essays and complete an online quiz.

The History of Boston I: The American Revolutionary Years

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

The Global Supply Chain: What is it and Why Does it Matter?

Course Overview This course provides an introduction to what is often referred to as the glue that holds the global economy together-the supply chain. It covers the five primary themes in supply chain management - Systems and Technologies; Dynamics; Design, Fundamentals; and Analytics. CalendarRegister

International Law and Human Rights

This course explores the political conditions, both international and domestic, that influence the creation, acceptance, operation, and effectiveness of the international rules governing individual human rights. We explore international human rights law and practice in theoretical terms; and we examine the international human rights regime itself. The course is designed to raise awareness of global human rights, and help students develop a basis of understanding through which they can build on in college and beyond. Students will write two short essays and also participate in an online group discussion.

Principles of Financial Accounting

Having a solid understanding of financial accounting principles is essential for making critical business decisions. In this course we cover three main areas of accounting: the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow. Each of these three section collectively make up what is commonly referred to as a companies financial statement. The course covers important accounting principles, such as how to record transactions using journal entries; how to post transactions to accounts; and how to prepare a trial balance, balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement. Other topics covered include analyzing financial statements, and forecasting and valuation. Students emerge better prepared for college-level accounting with a deeper understanding of the financial accounting methodology and its application in a number of business scenarios.

The History of Boston II: The Civil War Years

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

International Political Economy

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Environmental Justice

This course explores how race, socio-economic status, and interest group politics interact with and affect the formulation and implementation of US federal and state environmental policies. Do low income and minority populations, whether residing in urban or rural communities, bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences? We examine both evidence and opinion that there exists within the United States, as well as globally, a pattern of environmental inequity, injustice, and racism. We also evaluate the contention that underlying this pattern is a historical failure of the mainstream environmental movement to provide for the needs of traditionally marginalized communities. Students will write two essays and also complete a short online quiz.

Administrative Policymaking

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Humanitarian Emergencies in East Africa

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Global Health Challenges

This is an introductory course in the principal health problems of the world’s populations. It focuses on the major challenges to improving health at a global level. It explores inter-disciplinary factors that account for these health patterns, ranging from their physiological basis to their economic, social and political context. In this course, we explore the basics of infectious diseases, risk factors, health system performance, and the role of international agencies. Throughout the course, we look at what we currently know about global health problems. Students are encouraged to think creatively about the nature of these problems and ways to solve them. You will write one (1) essay, participate in an online discussion group, and complete several short online quizzes.

Constitutional Law

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Pre-College Research and Scholarly Writing

In order to do well in college, you will need to hone your reading and analytical skills, develop superior writing skills, and overcome your fears and anxieties about writing papers. If you want to learn how to get A’s on your college papers, this course is for you because it fulfills the immediate goal of becoming a better writer by preparing you for the kinds or reading and academic writing you are likely to encounter in undergraduate coursework. You will write and revise three essays ranging from the reflective to the analytics to the argumentative. In these essays, you will have the opportunity to write about your personal experiences, to address and question sources, to interpret texts, and to defend your interpretation with textual analysis and comparison. You will learn how to polish your prose, persuade others, and practice the process of drafting and revising to develop your authority and confidence as a writer. You will be able to apply your improved writing skills immediately when drafting that all-important personal statement to include with your college applications.

American Foreign Policy

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Constitutional Engineering

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Global Climate Change

This course focuses on the science of climate change, drawing attention to the latest research and evolving pattern of scientific data on climate that has emerged in recent years. Emphasis is given to analyzing the social changes and adaptations that human communities have already made and those they will most likely have to make as the Earth’s climate continues to change in the coming years. We also explore diplomatic efforts and related policy that has been launched since the creation of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in 1992. Students will complete weekly, online quizzes and also participate in an online discussion group.

Introduction to International Relations

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Globalization and Terrorism

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

Introduction to Statistics

Course Overview This course explores the historical origins, central teachings, and devotional practices of the major religious traditions―Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We  considered common themes of the human experience: the holy or sacred, evil and suffering, love and compassion, wisdom and justice, death and deliverance. We explore the roles and meanings...

The Transformation of China

Course Overview Contemporary China represents a society transforming itself through economic development and infrastructure investment that seeks global leadership. China's society and politics reflects its historical past, which is largely influence by patterns of philosophy and religion. In order to understand China in the twenty-­first century it is necessary to understand how its civilization developed....

Academic Writing and Critical Reading

The primary goal of this course is to help high-school students acquire the attitudes and skills needed to meet the expectations and demands of academic writing in college. Academic writing requires students to read and think critically, recognizing the complexity of issues and ideas; to tolerate and welcome that complexity; and to be dissatisfied with simple solutions and simplistic writing. Ultimately, you will produce papers that reflect complexity with a clarity of thought that engages readers. Students will keep reading journals, participate in online group discussions, and complete short papers that reflect their understanding of the material and concepts.

Principles of Economics

This course focuses on basic economic principles that help us understand the process of decision-making by individuals and businesses. We will analyze the fundamental economic activities of production, distribution, exchange, and consumption both at the micro and macro level. Besides developing an understanding of the functioning of a free market system, we will critically examine the controversies that surround the use of public policies for the greater common good. Students will complete weekly online quizzes and also participate in an online discussion.

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